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that there have been shipments going into iran, for instance -- into iraq for instance of aluminum tubes that really are only suited to high -- high quality aluminum tubes that are only suited for nuclear weapons programs, centrifuge programs. >> jon: she knew that was bull (bleep) at the time. what would a john mccain or lindsey graham say about a woman like that's qualifications for secretary of state?
policy experience, in that he voted for the iraq war. which he did. moz l to have. their presidential candidate vying to be president in the middle of our longest war ever took a big trip designed to fortify his foreign policy. he did not visit the war. he did not mention the war in his speech accepting the republican nomination and nobody knows whoo what he would have done about it had he become commander-in-chief. his position on in, setting a date for withdrawal would be a horrible mistake and that he would go along with setting a date for withdrawal. in terms of his broader take, the republican nominee's idea was that our great enemy in the world is russia. now in 2012. not like used to be that our enemy was russia, no. he thinks that right now our biggest foe in the world is not china, iran, north korea, no, it's russia. this is a weird and important time for the republican party. because you can't pick and choose what kind of presidency you're going to have. you can't predetermine what's going to be important in the country or for our country in the world. stuff happens. things
their experience working as embedded journalists in countries such as afghanistan, iraq and columbia. this is about 50 minutes. >> thank you for the introductions. i would like to thank you in advance. we are talking about the ethics of journalists. i am not a journalist. i am a historian. so could we start with what do you guys call this? do you refer to being embedded as -- how do we talk about this? >> i am embedded. yes. >> you do not say, i am on an embed. >> an embed means -- you could be with the military and not be embedded. i think it's a term of art now. it meansi signed a contract with the military. as far as i know, this is pretty much invented by the military and all this terminology, before that, you would just say, i am reporting with the army. >> there is an indication with embedded that you are living with them and you have shelter, food, and are with them. >> you can rely on them for food and security. we only refer to embeds as far as the military. >> it is about journalists who are working during world war ii. >> journalists were given a rank. the word embedded was not called th
of generals tried and failed in iraq. petraeus succeeded. here we have a leader who has done well. something happened between him and another person, a private consenting adults, nothing illegal, and we throw him out. i do not think we can afford to do that. we did not use to do that. dwight eisenhower carried on with his chauffeur, a very good- looking red-haired british woman. he was not fired. ike, you gotta go home, you had an affair. that would be crazy. that is kind of what we're doing these days. i think president obama should have said, you screwed up. you need to go home, make amends to your wife, do whatever you need to go -- do whatever you need to do. get some of that kobe bryant jewelry. your punishment -- you are staying in your job because your country needs you. i am sorry we throw them away. here is a guy who did three combat tours in iraq, a year in afghanistan. he and his family have given an awful lot to this country since 9/11. when the time came for us to be generous, we were not. i think it does say more about us than him. tavis: when you suggest that we care more abou
itself at that level to deal with the reactor in syria. the bush administration organized its iraq policy in another way. there are several models out there but it is important that i ran not be seen as one of 10 or 15 problems we have to deal with on a daily basis. iran is problem number one and will be for awhile. there are plenty of other problems in the middle east. first, syria -- i concur with everything dennis said. first of all, for the longest time, many people thought the fall of assad was inevitable so we would not have to do that much to provoke it. i'm not so sure, not because i don't think this insurgency is effected. i have been on the receiving end of a number of insurgencies in my career is. this is a very powerful and effective one. iran has command -- has committed -- syria has committed powerful friends that appear to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power, an iranian victory that will mark the good for our efforts to move iran to the negotiating table on nucl
[ticking] >> when ali allawi took over as iraq's minister of finance in 2005, he was confronted with a gaping hole in the treasury. more than a half a billion dollars that was supposed to equip the new iraqi army had been stolen from the ministry of defense by the very people the u.s. entrusted to run it. >> that's a lot of money. >> it's one of the biggest thefts in history, i think. >> most of the iraqi officials involved, including the former minister of defense, have skipped the country, but we found one of his deputies vacationing in paris. if you went back to baghdad, you'd be arrested. >> uh, no. nobody will arrest me. they will kill me. [ticking] [camera shutter snaps] >> these surveillance photos were taken by undercover police officers while they watched a team of seven south american thieves clean out an old navy store. >> shirts at $22.50, and they got the whole rack. >> when police moved in to make the arrest, they found enough merchandise to fill a room. all taken in less than an hour without anyone inside the store noticing a thing. [ticking] >> we have never seen
replacement. i'll also talk with another journalist who covered the general in iraq on ideas on why he may have cheated. >>> nearly two weeks after superstorm sandy ravaged the east coast, about 127,000 people on long island, new york, remain without power. it is sparking outrage with governor andrew cuomo as well as residents and now officials are vowing to do the job they say utility companies have not. >> what we have felt here is there's an absence of leadership and we're going to step in. we're working directly with the people on the ground to get power restored as quickly as possible. >> later today janet napolitano will make her second trip to staten island, the hardest hit of the new york voros. joining me is howard, a resident. we spoke yesterday. we wanted to check on you and see how you're doing today. any indication yet when you may get power back? >> well, good morning, randi. thanks for having me back. no indication yet. i certainly do appreciate the opportunity to express how disappointed my fellow oceanside residents and i continue to be with the emergency response. the one
and the wars in iraq and afghanistan. for about an hour at politics & prose in washington dc. >> evening, i am bradley graham, co-owner of politics & prose with my wife melissa. on behalf of the entire staff, i would like to welcome me you here. before turning to our guest author, i would just like to say a word about an important event coming up this april. it is being called world book night and it is an ambitious attempt to hand out 1 million free books around the united states. you can read about how this amazing effort is being organized, and sign up to get involved yourself at us.worldbooknight.org. the deadline is tonight, but there is still time after this event. now, a word about our guest this evening, paula broadwell. also, vernon loeb. and the new book, "all in: the education of david petraeus." paula was given unusual access to him and brought his story up today. as she writes early in the book, one of his most important mentors, general jack galvin, talk to him about the concept of the big "m", which stood for individual mystique or mythology. the troops need to be able to make t
, i think, is very much a mild thing. as an historian, i have to say, compared to his exploits in iraq and afghanistan. >> david petraeus steps down after confessing to an extramarital affair with his biographer. we speak about his role in iraq and afghanistan and the cia. then the nation marks of veterans day. >> in this country, we take care of our own, especially our veterans who have served us so bravely and have sacrificed so selflessly in our name. we carry on knowing that our best days always lie ahead. >> a major new investigation reveals how thousands of veterans are being denied disability benefits due to errors by the department of veterans affairs. >> there is nearly out of resources and in about of accumulated trauma that these soldiers, marines, and air men are experiencing, because of the war itself, continues to accumulate the law the war goes on. the military is playing catch- up more than 16,000 veterans are homeless. an estimated 18 veterans commit suicide every year. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. "the new york t
! (laughter) how about iraq? >> governor romney, was the war in iraq a good idea worth the cost in blood and treasure we have spent? >> it was the right decision to go into iraq. i supported it at the time; i support it now. >> jon: but do you support it -- (laughter). now? >> we don't want another iraq. we don't want another afghanistan. that's not the right course for us. >> well, i guess that's not a flip-flop so much as a principled recognition because of the iraq war's current unpopularity. (laughter) you know what? iraq and afghanistan those are yesterday's wars. it's tomorrow's war that counts and if there's anything governor romney has been vociferous about lo these past 18 months it is his uncompromising belief that it's time to rattle our sabers at iran. >> this is a president who should have instead communicated to iran that we are prepared, that we are considering military options, they're not just on the table, they are in our hands. >> the president should have built credible threat of military action. when they see our military option in our hand, a possible blockade or ae
about not leading any kind of stay behind force in iraq or announcing a date certain for our withdrawal from afghanistan, not supporting the people in iran when they rose up in 2009 in the green revolution, walking away from what solid support of democracy in the bush administration treating the war on terror like law enforcement officer but determining that we're going to bring terrorists on american soil. >> greta: it didn't happen. >> it didn't happen because people rose out. >> greta: how about this question. do we have more influence in the world now or do we have less influence? >> we had more influence, but the present world has a greater need of being reshaped because we operated within the structure. the president has to change the structure. if you look at the middle east we are used to thinking of states because that is what we have learned all our lives. in the middle east states created only around 1920. they were result of world war one and built by european countries and had their own rivalries. so countries like syria, iraq, jordan, those states had no existence before t
of the 21st century. those of you who are familiar with more fighting back since with pakistan, iraq and afghanistan know how important this has become but though one raid did iraq where operator seized the computer equivalent of the rolodex negative a rolodex that tracked 500 al qaeda suicide bombers or terrace filtered into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just about every type of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from the old fashioned spy
in the iraq and afghanistan wars. >>> some lawmakers are outraged that the fbi left them in the dark about its investigation into general david petraeus' extramarital affair. new york congressman peter king talked with cnn's candy crowley today. >> it seems this has gone on for several months and now it appears they're saying the fbi didn't realize until election day that general petraeus was involved. it just doesn't add up. >> petraeus resigned from his post as cia director after his affair with his by og gra fer paula broadwell went public two days ago. much more on the investigation in a few minutes on cnn. >>> a bipartisan plan for immigration reform appears to be in the work. charles schumer and lindsay graham say their plan includes a tough love path to citizenship. graham and schumer teamed up on immigration back in 2010, and that plan went nowhere. republicans may have fresh motivation after election losses last week. >>> two newly reported deaths in new york have raised the death toll from superstorm sandy to at least 113. nearly two weeks after the storm crashed through the northeas
at the tomb of the unknowns and then met with families who lost loved ones in the iraq and afghanistan wars. >>> lawmakers have pointed questions about the fbi's investigation into general petraeus' extramarital affair. they want to know why they weren't told, and they want to know if national security was breached. peter king talked to candy crowley today. >> it seems that this has been going on for several months and now appears that the fbi did not realize until election day that general petraeus was involved. it just doesn't add up. >> petraeus resigned from the post as cia director friday and mitt head had an affair. and then sources said that the affair was with whiz biographer paula broadwell. more on that in a few moments. >>> bipartisan agreement appears to be in the work. charles schumer and lindsey graham says that their path including a tough love to citizenship. they teamed up in 2010, and that plan went nowhere, but the republicans may have fresh motivation after election losses last week. >>> death toll from superstorm sandy has climbed to 113 with two more deaths reported in
to general petraeus and worked with him and followed his career up close as he researched a book after iraq, and i asked him what it was like to interview petraeus. >> i wrote a book about him and i interviewed him -- a book about iraq and interviewed him in 2010 and when i asked him for an interview, i got an e-mail response from him directly like that. i got other e-mails from him subsequent to that, subsequent to our interview, where he was enthusiastic and supportive and cheering me on for getting good reviews, and it was like i had a mentor. you know, he is very effective personally. but then when i start reading about the fact that he may have been obsessively e-mailing his mistress and so forth, he struck me as a man who may have had a digital addiction or a digital, almost like a digital mania, which i think all of us can maybe relate to these days, because he's a guy who was constantly e-mailing, texting and perhaps he was googling himself too much and should have had a real life. he lived in a bubble where he was lionized by the military and by the press, and that turns out to hav
into escalating afghanistan, he ran a campaign in iraq that was brutally savage, included arming, the worst of the worst. shiite death squads, sunni militiamen and go back to the training training that also had problems. to me, the questions of honor and integrity, i was raising those earlier. a number of other journalists covering petraeus were raising those concerns. you might not get that from someone at barbara starr at cnn who is essentially a spokesperson for the pentagon in many ways. so i think i just want to step back and have my piece because even the way the scandal is being covered is so different than how usual sex scandals are being covered where they hammer the guy. now everyone is saying oh, my god, he just went to the cia, how could he be, you know, he was susceptible to being seduced by this woman. give me a break. he has all his allies coming out to defend him where paula broadwell is there yet again, where are her protectors? >> barbara is not a spokesperson, obviously. let's move to -- >> not too obviously. i followed her coverage pretty closely as she covered my work b
? they participated in the iraq war and world war ii. >> you can daypack to the famous example of the abraham lincoln war elephant troubles with the war but in the 20th century with the close u.s. ally -- ally disrupted partly but as soon as the cold war gels thailand comes as the strong u.s. ally and definitely a strong cold war ally as the component to the u.s. global strategy. >>host: why do you call it "in buddha's company"? >> those who fought saw themselves says buddhist warriors. some as a logical someday tried to halt communism as a threat to the practice of values or religious tradition they saw buddhism and is under threat by a communism past to do with thailand as being the center of the intense tradition and many thai soldiers that fought they're took in both in front of what we call the enrolled buddha and many of them wore buddhist amulets especially when they came in contact with soldiers with other countries as the defying simple and to rebuild the buddhist temples that were abandoned because of the fighti
. >> i was having nightmares about iraq, a place i've never been. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening an american soldier accused of a horrific war crime watched in a courtroom as children described the murders of their families. there were two days of testimony in the case of staff sergeant robert bales. bales is charged with 16 counts of pre-meditated murder and six counts of attempted murder. prosecutors say that for reasons unknown bales walked off his post in afghanistan in the middle of the night then shot and stabbed civilians in two villages. the hearing at a military post in washington state was called to decide whether there is enough evidence to court-martial bales. john blackstone has been covering in the courtroom. >> reporter: staff sergeant bales watched the video feed from afghanistan show nothing reaction as ten afghans told of the night their two villages were awakened by gunshots. nine of the murder victims were children. the massacre was one of the worst crimes attributed to a u.s. serviceman
francisco international poetry festival from iraq i've been in touch with for more than a year and a half. after the united states would not give him his visa, i asked him -- i told him about mutanabbi street and he wrote a poem and he wrote it in english, though he writes in, of course, in arabic. but this one he wrote in english. so i'll read it. one figure in the poem you should know, humbaba, which is an ogre, a monster of immemorial age. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who
in baghdad, iraq. i remember the explosion very clearly. it's something i'll never forget, and ultimately over the next two weeks, i would lose my legs above the knee. well, when i came home, of course, wounded, that was a new experience for me. i had never come home without my troops. i really felt alone. i did say absolutely enough is enough. not that i got to a point where i felt like i was going to take my life or anything like that, but i just didn't want to be a burden to anyone, and i just wanted to kind of crawl in my hole and kind of collapse on myself. i'm very grateful, and thank god that i didn't do that. for me when i tried to quit, when i tried to crawl into that shell, it was very uncomfortable because that wasn't who i was. i'm the garrison commander of fort belvoir, va vachlirginia. we support a base of about 15,000. all of our services appreciate the value that someone has regardless of what they don't have anymore. this event that happened to me doesn't define me, and it's not something i dwell on. i wouldn't characterize myself as a hero. i mean, ultimately, those that
generation, the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm, and operation iraqi freedom. it's a big topic, and it needs to be discussed, and investigated, which is part of the reason why we took on this topic. >> host: in your book, where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement in the middle east? >> guest: well, the u.s. involvement in the middle east goes much further back. we're specifically looking at the persian gulf, and although u.s. navy frigates and ships paid some port calls in previous centuries, it really is world war ii that the united states and its military gets involved in the gulf in a big way. >> host: why? >> guest: well, surprisingly, it doesn't have to do directly with oil. world war iimarked the entry of the united states and its military for two reasons. one is to provide a secure pathway for supplies to our bee league erred soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans. so the persian gulf route represented one pathway the united states could send lease equipment through a back channel, through persia and iraq or iran, through the mountains, and we
a year after commanding u.s. forces in iraq and afghanistan. ed henry is live for us at the white house. how much did this catch the white house off guard. >> big time, harris. officials here say they were stunned when general petraeus came over here to the white house yesterday and revealed this to the president after calling over saying he wanted to have a meeting. the president put out a statement a short time ago praising general petraeus. he said, in part. he is one of the outstanding general officers of his generation helping our military adapt to new challenges and leading our men and women in uniform through a remarkable period of service in iraq and afghanistan where he helped our nation put those wars on a path to spoobs cybil end as director of the central intelligence agency he has continued to serve with characteristic, intellectual rigor, dedication and patriotism. that's important to note. the mention of iraq and afghanistan, this is a general who bridged the last two administrations. he helped -- he was the architect of the surge in rawng in 2007 under then president bus
i'm talking from an iraq-centric perspective. i think everyone is looking for lessons learned. well, didn't we learn any lessons from iraq or afghanistan or you name the crisis? and the problem is, we always learn a lot of lessons, and we don't learn any lessons. and i think if you look at what i want to do is lay out some of the dilemma here for those who are wondering what we are supposed to do. now, um, i think you have to put a certain perspective on this as well. those of us who sit in washington find difficulty in putting the issues that are going on in the middle east in perspective, especially in an election year. we're good americans, and we tend to take a very short view of history. we can only think ahead to the next election -- whoops, that's only two weeks -- and many of us don't remember the last election. i have students who note know -- who don't know about the vietnam war because they were born after, and that's hard for me to take in. our collective memory lasts about as long as a football game. the problem is many people look at yesterday's enemy as tomorrow's tra
who may have walked into danger in iraq but it is frightening to walk into a company and try to get a job because it is a different culture. the organizations, the institutions have got to open their arms. there will have to be an awful lot of veterans and some who will week bills behind them. it is different than after world war ii because the smaller population, which makes it harder. they are more of a minority. it is important we do these things to reassure them and the organizations. >> i need a point of order. [laughter] >> you can go on this time. i do not want to through do that again. >> it is not as ivy league schools. my college -- public institution that serves the inner-city section of york -- did away with rotc about 16 years after i graduated because of the vietnam war. they have decided to bring it back this year. [applause] >> i want to leave you with one story and one thought. i was in minnesota. they have the military appreciation fund. they collect money for rehab, college, and other things. it unifies the entire state. the speaker was a mother of a national guar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,858 (some duplicates have been removed)